Sask. premier describes federal carbon tax plan as a ‘ransom note’

Federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna unveiled plans for a federally imposed carbon tax Thursday morning.

The price will be $10 per tonne of CO2 for any jurisdiction that has not developed their own carbon pricing strategy as early as next spring.

McKenna said every penny raised by the federal carbon price will be returned to the province it came from. The plan is to give it directly back to individuals and businesses through tax rebates.

HangZhou Night Net

READ MORE: It’s not a carbon tax, it’s a ‘behaviour-changing measure’: government officials

Provinces that enact their own carbon pricing plan can choose how to spend the collected revenue.

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall remains staunchly opposed to the carbon tax, saying it would remove $1.3 billion from the provincial economy.

“This federal government white paper is more like a ransom note,” he said.

READ MORE: Environment Minister Scott Moe says Saskatchewan will never allow a carbon tax

Wall stood by previous arguments, that a price on carbon will disproportionately affect key Saskatchewan industries like mining and agriculture.

“Even if fuel tax is exempt [for agriculture] it will still impact fertilizer, inputs and transportation,” Wall said.

The premier did credit McKenna for acknowledging Saskatchewan based innovations including the Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) facility at Boundary Dam Three near Estevan, Sask., zero-till farming methods and ongoing research at the province’s universities.

However, Wall still believes investment in innovations like CCS should be seen as an alternative to a carbon tax.

Wall said the provincial government still plans to take legal action against the federal government.

READ MORE: Brad Wall criticizes attempt to link carbon tax with equalization payments

McKenna said Ottawa has the authority to impose a carbon tax on the province because protecting the environment is federal jurisdiction.

Officials from McKenna’s office added that this is not a tax in the traditional sense, because it is not intended to raise revenue for the federal government. Instead its goal is to change behavior when it comes to pollution.

READ MORE: Energy CEOs discuss Alberta’s carbon tax as Sask. continues to voice opposition

Saskatchewan has its own carbon tax framework that would target heavy emitters, and collected revenue would go toward an innovation fund. It was developed in 2009, but has not been implemented.

When asked by a reporter if Wall would sooner implement this plan or a forced federal carbon price, his response was simple.

“We’re going to win in court,” Wall said.

With files from the Canadian Press

More to come…

7-month-old baby who weighed 9 lbs died from gluten, lactose-free diet, court hears

A Belgian couple are on trial following the death of their seven-month-old son, who died of malnourishment after being fed an alternative diet.

Lucas, whose last name isn’t being revealed, died on June 6, 2014, weighing only nine pounds. According to local reports, he was suffering dehydration, and his stomach and intestines were found to be empty.

HangZhou Night Net

Normal weight for male infants of that age ranges from 14.5 to 22 pounds, according to the World Health Organization.

Prosecutors say the boy’s death was a result of the parents feeding their son a restricted diet.

READ MORE: Spanish baby develops scurvy after parents feed him almond milk-only diet

The parents —; identified as Peter, 34, and Sandrina, 30 —; made the diagnosis that their son was gluten intolerant and had a lactose allergy. They began feeding him alternative products such as rice milk and quinoa milk.

Despite the parents’ concerns their child suffered from allergies, they did not seek professional advice. A search for medical documents for the child came up short.

“Not a single doctor had a dossier about Lucas and child protection services did not know about them,” prosecutors said.

In response, the baby’s father said: “We never went with Lucas to a doctor because we never noticed anything unusual.”

When it became apparent to the parents that their son was in need of urgent care, they sought help from a homeopathic doctor an hour’s drive from their home; the practitioner immediately sent them to the hospital, where their son was pronounced dead.

The parents, who own a natural health food store and have three other children, say their son was a happy child.

“We never wanted the death of our son,” his mother said.

New research released earlier this month warned people who don’t suffer from celiac disease to be wary of gluten-free diets, because these diets could put them at a higher risk of heart disease.

READ MORE:
Going gluten-free to ward off heart disease might have opposite effect: study

The case isn’t the first of its kind, with similar ones cropping up all over the world, prompting lawmakers to consider the effects of special diets on children.

In Italy, a bill introduced last summer could jail parents who imposed strict diets on their children. The law would see parents face a year in prison for raising kids on a vegan diet, and up to four years in prison if kids develop long-term health implications from their diet.

READ MORE:
Italian couple loses custody of child after strict vegan diet lands him in hospital

“I just find it absurd that some parents are allowed to impose their will on children in an almost fanatical, religious way, often without proper scientific knowledge or medical consultation… do-it-yourself on these matters terrorizes me,” Elvira Savino, the politician who proposed the bill, told Reuters at the time.

Closer to home, an Alberta couple was found guilty last year of failing to provide the necessities of life after their 18-month-old son died of bacterial meningitis. David and Collet Stephan had treated their son Ezekiel with home remedies that included garlic and horseradish.

READ MORE: Alberta meningitis death trial shines light on natural medicine

Critics say toddler’s meningitis death a wake-up call about natural medicine

02:42

Critics say toddler’s meningitis death a wake-up call about natural medicine

01:27

‘Very clear’ parents in Stephan meningitis trial did not meet necessities of care

01:43

Online post by father of Ezekiel Stephan criticizes prosecutor



*with files from Carmen Chai

Montreal’s Irish insist sacred burial ground shouldn’t be developed

Fergus Keyes walks through a parking lot near the Victoria Bridge, but unlike any other in the city, he considers this piece of land to be sacred ground.

Underneath the concrete lies the 150-year-old remains of thousands of Irish immigrants.

“Since 1907, Irish Montrealers have been asking for this space to be developed into a proper memorial space, but nothing has ever happened,” said Keyes, who is the director of the Montreal Irish Monument Park Foundation.

HangZhou Night Net

He wants the land converted into a park and memorial.

In 1847, during the Irish Famine, 100,000 Irish immigrants came to Canada, but many contracted typhus and died.

“Six-thousand [people] were dying over a period of a couple of months,” Keyes said.

“In the end, they were being trenched, the bodies were being thrown in.”

Crown corporation Canada Lands Company (CLC) owns the land.

Keyes had asked the company to donate it to his group or the city, but told Global News he just found out the corporation sold the land to a developer.

“We have asked on numerous occasions, ‘what kind of development?’ but for some reason, they feel they don’t have to tell us who they sold the land to and what they plan to do with it,” Keyes said.

The CLC said in a statement the property is under contract for sale, but would provide few other details, despite Hydro-Quebec confirming to Global News that it bought the land.

The contract has an obligation to include a future Irish heritage commemoration, but did not say what that is.

“On a personal level, I would find it both disrespectful and insulting, not just to the Irish community, but to all of Montreal,” said Keyes.

There is an existing memorial across the street from the parking lot, known as the Black Rock, erected in 1859.

“We don’t believe it’s a proper memorial. It’s a small space, it sits in the middle of a bloody highway, it’s dangerous to get to,” he said.

Keyes hopes Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre will intervene.

“Clearly what happened in those days is important to commemorate, so we will take a look at it,” Coderre said.

The CLC confirmed its deal will close in July and there will be some sort of park on site, but Keyes argued he won’t be satisfied if any part of the land doesn’t respect what’s buried below.

It’s not a carbon tax, it’s a ‘behaviour-changing measure’: government officials

The Liberal government today released the carbon-pricing scheme it will impose on any province or territory that, by spring 2018, doesn’t have its own comparable scheme in place.

As of today, 97 per cent of Canadians live in provinces that either already have a price on carbon pollution, or are planning and working toward it, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Thursday.

HangZhou Night Net

The three per cent of Canadians left out of that equation are in Saskatchewan – the one province that continues to hold out on signing on to the Trudeau government’s climate change plan.

READ MORE: Trump administration initiates NAFTA renegotiation process

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is so opposed to the idea, he has said he’ll fight Ottawa all the way to the Supreme Court.

But McKenna isn’t concerned. Rather she’s certain imposing a country-wide price on carbon pollution is Ottawa’s prerogative.

“We’ve been working hard to work with Saskatchewan,” she told reporters, noting she’s had more than a dozen meetings on this issue with the province’s environment minister.

“But let me be absolutely clear, that it is well within the federal government’s right to take action to protect the environment.”

READ MORE:
Sask. premier describes federal carbon tax plan as a ‘ransom note’

Environment Canada officials earlier in the day said a possible basis for legal action from Saskatchewan would be that the federal government cannot impose a tax on a province or territory. On that front, the feds are safe, the official said.

“This is not a revenue-raising tax,” he said. “This a behaviour-changing measure.”

Any revenue generated from whatever scheme a province develops will go right back to the province, though Ottawa is still determining exactly how that will happen; officials said they are so far looking at ways to return the funds to residents or businesses, which could help offset rising costs of energy.

Most Canadians live in jurisdictions where carbon pollution is already levied in some form.

B.C. and Alberta have carbon taxes, while Ontario and Quebec have cap-and-trade systems. Nova Scotia has said it intends to create a cap-and-trade system in 2018, and the other Atlantic provinces are gauging whether to join Nova Scotia’s plan or go it alone.

While the Liberal government is standing ready to impose the levy scheme it unveiled today, the scheme is also available to any province that doesn’t want to develop and implement its own.

Thursday’s “technical paper” on the federal carbon pricing plan details the levies on liquid, gas and solid fossil fuels Ottawa would impose in order to meet the targets Prime Minister Justin Trudeau laid out late last year.

READ MORE:
Brad Wall criticizes attempt to link carbon tax with equalization payments

Canada has agreed to cut its emissions to 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. That requires a reduction of almost 200 million tonnes of carbon-equivalent emissions in 13 years, or the equivalent of taking every car in Canada off the road, twice.

In October, Trudeau announced his government’s intention to introduce a minimum price – or “floor price” – for carbon pollution of $10 per tonne in 2018, increasing to $50 per tonne by 2022.

With files from

Forget casual sex – millennials want to date but don’t know how to have healthy relationships: report

Dating and hanging out with friends is top of mind for millennials, but difficult to do because they struggle with cultivating lasting and healthy romantic relationships, a new Harvard report says.

What they’re not up for, however, is casual sex.

According to researchers, teens and adults tend to “greatly overestimate” the hook-up culture of millennials, which fuels misconceptions that can be harmful to young people.

HangZhou Night Net

READ MORE: Should people stay friends with their exes after a breakup?

“We hope that this report is a real wake-up call,” Dr. Richard Weissbourd, lead author of the study, said in a statement. “While adults, and parents in particular, wring their hands about the ‘hook-up culture,’ research indicated that far fewer young people are hooking up than is commonly believed.”

The study surveyed over 3,000 young adults between the ages of 18 and 25 in the U.S., as well as looked at several years of research by Weissbourd and his team. They also talked with adults who are key to the demographic, like parents, teachers, sport coaches and counsellors.

From their research, the team found that when people overestimate the hook-up culture of millennials, it can make them feel embarrassed or ashamed, and puts pressure on them to have sex when they’re not interested or ready.

As well, 70 per cent of respondents said they wished they had been given more information from their parents about the emotional aspects of romantic relationships.

“This focus on the hook-up culture also obscures two much bigger issues that our research suggests many young people are struggling with: forming and maintaining healthy and fulfilling romantic relationships and dealing with widespread misogyny and sexual harassment,” Weissbourd said. “Unfortunately, we also found that most adults appear to be doing very little to address these serious problems.”

In fact, 87 per cent of women who took part in the study said they’d experienced some form of sexual harassment during their lifetime, yet 76 per cent of said they’d never spoken to their parents about how to avoid sexually harassing others.

“[Adults] don’t say anything, even when sexual harassment is right in their midst,” Weissbourd told ABC News. “And many tell us… they don’t say anything because they don’t know what to say. And they fear that they won’t be effective, or they fear they will be written off.”

READ MORE: How to start dating again after ending a long-term relationship

This could be because many millennials don’t feel gender-based degradation is a problem in today’s society.

Digging deeper, researchers found that 48 per cent of young people believe that society has reached a point where double standards against women no longer exist.

Parents are also neglecting to discuss the issue of sexual assault.

Of the respondents, 61 per cent of say they’ve never talked about “being sure your partner wants to have sex and is comfortable doing so before having sex,” the report states. They’ve also never discussed assuring their own comfort before engaging in sex (49 per cent), the importance of not pressuring others into having sex (56 per cent), the importance not continuing that pressure to have sex despite the other person saying ‘no’ (62 per cent), or the importance of not having sex with someone who is too intoxicated or impaired to properly consent (57 per cent).

And those who did have those conversations with their parents say they were “at least somewhat influential.”

To address these issues, researchers offered up several tips for parents.

    Talk about love and help teens understand the differences between mature love and other form of attractionShow young people how to identify healthy and unhealthy relationshipsHelp young people identify misogyny and harassmentIf parents and educators see unhealthy relationship behaviours (like hearing degrading words, for example), they should interveneTalk about what it means to be ethical by helping them develop the skills to maintain healthy romantic relationships and treat those who are different from them with dignity and respect

For more tips, click here.

Follow @danidmedia

Mr. Biggles, ‘utter bastard of a cat,’ up for adoption in Melbourne

A cat adoption agency in Melbourne had some fun with the cat bio for one of their latest wards, Mr. Biggles, describing him in a hilariously honest manner.

“Mr. Biggles (also known as Lord Bigglesworth) is an utter, utter, utter bastard,” it begins.

HangZhou Night Net

According to Gina Brett, the author of the description and a volunteer with the rescue group Cat People of Melbourne, the feline is quite feisty.

READ MORE:
Maine Coon in Australia may be world’s longest cat

“Mr. Biggles is a despot and a dictator. He will let you know he is not happy, which is often, because things are often just not up to his high standards,” his bio reads.

The dark humour and straightforward description has seemed to charm several cat lovers.

“This is by far the best description of a cat I have ever read! So raw and honest, I love it!” wrote Facebook user Joanne Keith.

People from around the world have since expressed their admiration of Mr. Biggles.

The rescue group has even launched a blog for the kitty, where they promise he will be updating with articles on “how to play with a dog and not kill it” and “getting what you want from human slaves.”

Although Cat People of Melbourne is accepting applications for people who want to be Mr. Biggles’ “human slave,” no suitable candidate has been found yet.

“Mr. Biggles is not a cat for the inexperienced or faint-hearted. He is a full-blooded tomcat with very firm boundaries,” Brett said. “Mr. Biggles needs an owner that won’t take his nipping personally but won’t let him get away with bad behaviour, either.”

Follow @jennynotjen

‘Big Brother Canada’ finale: Season 5 winner crowned

SPOILER ALERT: Do not read on unless you’ve watched the Big Brother Canada Season 5 finale.

Big Brother Canada (BBCAN) crowned Kevin Martin as the Season 5 winner during Thursday night’s finale on Global.

Kevin Martin, a 24-year-old professional poker player and content creator from Calgary, Alberta, beat out 16 houseguests to be named champion.

WATCH BELOW: Big Brother Canada: Kevin raises the stakes in Season 5 return

HangZhou Night Net

READ MORE: ‘Big Brother Canada’ host Arisa Cox analyzes returning ‘BBCAN’ vets

The contest came down to fellow finalist Karen Singbeil, 53, and Kevin, who received a second chance at playing the game after appearing in Season 3.

Kevin and Karen both fielded questions from the jury about why they deserved to win the $100,000 grand prize, a $30,000 home furnishing makeover from The Brick and a new 2017 Toyota 76.

Kevin received all nine of the jury votes to secure his victory.

Demetres Giannitsos had previously won the first round of the final head of household competition but Kevin won the second and third rounds and sent Demetres to jury, choosing to take Karen to the final two with him.

“This time I want to get to know people deeper on a personal level,” Kevin said before entering the competition for a second time.

READ MORE: ‘Big Brother Canada’ Season 5: Final group of houseguests revealed

Kevin was one of the first houseguests to be evicted as a result of a triple eviction in Season 3 and he’s also the first houseguest in BBCAN history to be kicked out of the house without receiving any eviction votes against him.

By the end of this season, Kevin felt like he was completely alone in the house and announced that many times to the BBCAN cameras.

In one of his final pleas to the jury members, Kevin said, “Since you all have left, I’ve been by myself in this game. The only reason I am here is because I won the power of veto during the triple eviction. I am alone, isolated and targeted.”

This season, Kevin won head of household twice, the power of veto four times and was put on the block three times.

Before entering the BBCAN house, Kevin was asked, “What element of Big Brother Canada did you not have a chance to try before, that you’d like to experience this time around?”

Kevin’s answer was simple: “The end of the game!”

He continued: “I went home ninth out from the end. The game changes so drastically in those final weeks, the decisions get so much more intense. I want to stick around all the way through to the end.”

Some fans of BBCAN were ecstatic about Kevin’s win.

Others wished that the finale had played out differently.

Were you surprised that Kevin won Big Brother Canada 5?

Take Our PollFollow @KatieScottNews

Calgary police adopt committee to review sexual assault cases dismissed as unfounded

Calgary police are taking steps to review sexual assault cases that investigators dismiss as unfounded — meaning they have evidence to suggest the offence didn’t occur.

A Case Review Committee is being formed to “take a second look” at cases the Calgary Police Service (CPS) dismiss as unfounded. The approach was first adopted in Philadelphia 17 years ago.

CPS investigators will meet with the independent members of the committee three times a year, according to a release, to review all new cases of reported sexual assault that have been deemed unfounded.

The committee members will be able to look over all details of the cases, except identities and private information about those involved.

WATCH: Wed, May 3: CPS Staff Sergeant Melanie Oncescu from the Child Abuse Unit, believes the confidence and stigma of reporting sexual assaults are being reduces

HangZhou Night Net

Committee members include Alberta’s Minister of Status of Women, as well as representatives from the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre and Communities against Sexual Abuse (CCASA).

“We know that sexual violence is a gendered crime. The vast majority of survivors of sexual violence are women, and I hope this helps them feel safe to come forward to tell their story,” status of women minister Stephanie MacLean said in a release.

“I want every survivor to know we believe them, and they deserve to be treated fairly and with respect.”

Sarah MacDonald, a forensic psychologist with the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre, said she was looking forward to examining and providing insight on how police conduct their investigations into sexual assault reports.

“As a forensic psychologist on the committee, I am excited to provide scientific-based knowledge on memory and forensic interviewing best practices that can be incorporated into the sexual offence strategies,” she said.

Calgary police dismiss about 10 per cent of cases as unfounded

Calgary police said the initiative was undertaken as a result of a Globe and Mail investigation, which revealed police in Canada dismiss one of every five reported sexual assaults as unfounded.

At the time, CPS said, Calgary police dismissed about 10 per cent of sexual assault cases, 62 per year, as unfounded. The national average, according to the Globe and Mail, is 19 per cent.

Studies show the unfounded reporting rate for sexual assaults is between two and eight per cent.

“Calgary’s unfounded rate was lower than average, both nationally and provincially,” Staff Sergeant Bruce Walker said in a release.

“But there are still other police agencies that are doing better than us. We felt it was important to learn from their successes and see what we can do even better here.”

CPS said sexual assaults should only be dismissed as unfounded if investigators have determined the assault didn’t happen or wasn’t attempted, and that no other other offence happened at the reported time and place.

“At CCASA we know that the rate of unfounded cases has needed to be addressed across the country for a long time, and we are very hopeful that this committee will be able to effectively address it in our city,” CCASA CEO Danielle Aubry said in a release.

“We are pleased that the Calgary Police Service has taken a leadership role in recognizing the importance of this issue and is willing to open up their processes to a committee of external community partners.”

Comparatively, Edmonton’s unfounded rate is 10 per cent, Toronto rate is at seven per cent, Ottawa 28 per cent and Halifax 13 per cent.

La Loche school shooting: teen told police he had regrets about the shooting

A teen gunman who killed four people at a home and in a school in northern Saskatchewan told police he had regrets about the shooting.

Dayne and Drayden Fontaine were killed at their house in La Loche in January 2016 before the shooter went to the high school, where he killed a teacher and a teacher’s aide.

HangZhou Night Net

Related

  • La Loche shooter could face significantly different sentences

  • The untold stories of the La Loche, Sask. school shooting

  • La Loche school shooting victim wants adult sentence for teen who killed 4, wounded 7

    READ MORE: Students had a look of ‘horror on their faces’: La Loche shooting victim

    The teen was asked in a videotaped police interview, which was played at his sentencing hearing Thursday, how he felt when he thought about killing the two brothers.

    “I didn’t plan to shoot them, man. I already told you. They weren’t part of the plan,” he said, crying, in the video.

    The officer asked him what the plan was.

    “Go to the school and shoot the f—;ing kids,” said the teen.

    The teen was also asked what he would say to Dayne and Drayden now.

    “Tell them that I’m sorry, man.”

    The teen has pleaded guilty to two counts of first-degree murder, two counts of second-degree murder and seven counts of attempted murder.

    The sentencing hearing is to determine if the teen, who can’t be named because he was just shy of his 18th birthday at the time, should be sentenced as a youth or an adult.

    Court has heard that Dayne Fontaine was shot 11 times, twice in the head, and Drayden was shot twice, including in the back of the head.

    The boys’ mother, Alicia Fontaine, told court in Meadow Lake, Sask., that the teen gunman called her two days after the shooting to apologize.

    “I may be angry, but I’m not angry at him,” Fontaine said.

    “I talked to him. He was crying. I forgave him. You can forgive, but you’ll never forget.”

    If it were up to her, Fontaine said, she would not press charges in the deaths of her sons.

    “It is true, my whole world is gone, but I know my babies are in a place where there is no pain,” she said.

    “I have forgiven you.”

    READ MORE: ‘Don’t shoot me’: sentencing hearing underway in La Loche shooting

    The shooter’s mother said the family has also forgiven her son for “this horrible crime.”

    “I was in shock like everyone else,” she told court. “I never knew this was going to happen.”

    The teen’s mother said she feels guilty, although she knows the shooting wasn’t her fault.

    “I am not a bad mother or person. If I knew and seen the signs that he was struggling in life, I could have stopped all of this from happening,” she said.

    “Sometimes, as parents, we are unaware of the struggles that our children have.”

    Video surveillance from the school shows the teen walking and running through hallways firing a shotgun. Teacher Adam Wood and teacher’s aide Marie Janvier were killed and seven others were hurt.

    In the police interview, the teen is asked who he was targeting when he went into the school.

    “Nobody,” he replied.

    FULL COVERAGE: La Loche school shooting

    The officer asked the teen who he was looking for when he was trying to open doors.

    “Teachers and students,” he said.

    The defence has said there is no simple reason behind the shooting and little about the motive has been made clear so far.

    Earlier in the interview, the shooter said he never felt bullied. The officer also asked the teen if he felt the school had “wronged” him.

    “Not really,” he said. “I don’t think so, no.”

Crime Stoppers: Appeal for information about missing Abbotsford couple

In a mysterious disappearance, an Abbotsford couple vanishes without a trace.

Rosalie Jean Allan known as Rose was reported missing by a friend in December of 2013. Investigators soon realized that Rose’s  boyfriend Jonathan Wood was also missing.

It’s been a particularly difficult case for investigators in Abbotsford who say they’ve had very little information and few leads.

Police and Crime Stoppers need your help. Do you have any information that could help crack the case?

HangZhou Night Net

The couple, described as being in an “on again, off again relationship” had been living together on Glenmore Rd in North Abbotsford in late October 2013.

Previously the couple were known to frequent an area of downtown Abbotsford known as Five Corners as well as the Salvation Army on Gladys Ave.

Rose, known by many as a vibrant person,  loved animals and made friends easily. Her family says they love and miss her. Despite her transient lifestyle she managed to keep in touch with her parents.  Her father says his daughter was in good spirits when she went missing. Her parents and Jonathan’s parents are pleading for anyone with information to come forward.

At the time of her disappearance Rose was 46 years old. She is 5′ 4″ and weighs 130 pounds. She has brown hair and blue eyes.

Jonathan’s 6’2”, 180 pounds, with brown hair and blue eyes.  He has an outstanding theft warrant but police say it’s not a serious matter.

Police say it’s highly unlikely for them to simply disappear. Can you help solve this mystery?

If you know anything call police…or if you’d like to remain anonymous visit bccrimestoppers杭州桑拿 or call 1 888 222- 8477.