Halifax police issue over $1,500 in tickets after rescuing dogs from car, remind owners to keep pets safe

As Haligonians enjoy unusually warm weather Thursday, Halifax Regional Police (HRP) is reminding people the hot weather can mean added dangers for people’s furry friends — and to not leave them unattended in parked vehicles.

Police say that a car left unattended, even with the windows open, can quickly become like a furnace and can create possible “fatal consequences” for pets inside.

READ MORE:
London Humane Society helping feline moms on Mother’s Day

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Halifax police have already had to rescue two dogs from a vehicle during Thursday’s warm temperatures. According to Cindy Bayers, a police spokesperson, the driver of the vehicle was given three tickets; two $697.50 tickets for leaving animals in an unattended vehicle in conditions that could cause distress and one $250 ticket for owning an unlicensed dog.

Bayers says that if anyone sees a pet in immediate distress, they should call 911 immediately and take directions from the operator.

“We appreciate that people want to help but they’re opening themselves up to issues if they damage other peoples properties,” said Bayers.

READ MORE:
Dogs get decked out for annual Halifax Christmas Pet Parade

HRP have provided a list of alternatives should a person not be able to leave their pet at home:

If you’re visiting a restaurant, HRP suggests people use the drive-thru, allowing your pet to sit with you comfortably while you wait for your food. In addition, they remind people that many businesses have a drive-thru, not just fast-food establishments.Police say if you’re heading somewhere with your pet, bring a friend who can stay in the car and keep the pet company. The friend can also take the pet for a walk, stay in the shade or give the pet some water while they wait for you to return.More stores are allowing pets inside, police say. As a result, they suggest people shop “pet-friendly” by asking stores if they allow pets, and when you return, bring the pet indoors with you for a shopping excursion — though they remind people to make sure the pet is well-behaved before you bring them along.

Quebec pit bull ban and police uniform bills postponed

The provincial government will not pass two important bills which impact Montreal: the pit bull ban and the bill mandating proper uniforms for police officers will not come to a vote this June.

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Debate around other bills introduced by the justice minister was heated this week, but on Thursday, the government offered an olive branch to the opposition. It says it will make three of minister Stephanie Vallee’s bills its top priorities for the end of this session.

That means the pit bull law and the ban on colourful pants worn by police officers will not be passed before the National Assembly goes on summer break.

READ MORE:
‘Catastrophic consequences’: Montreal SPCA concerned about Quebec dangerous dog bill

“Certainly not,” government house leader Jean-Marc Fournier confirmed.

“This has been an almost do-nothing National Assembly led by the Liberals in the last year,” said Parti Quebecois leader Jean-François Lisée.

The government has its work cut out for it — and only a three-week deadline. The first priority is to make some adoption information, such as like family health history, available to adopted children. A version of this bill has been on the table for nine years.

READ MORE:
Quebec adopts law to force government lawyers, notaries back to work

“It is a real priority… because it really concerns human lives,” said PQ justice critic Veronique Hivon.

The second priority is to fix delays in the justice system. Opposition parties are pressuring the government to use the notwithstanding clause to ignore the Supreme Court’s Jordan ruling.

People accused of murder and sexual assault have walked free because their cases have taken too long to go to trial.

READ MORE:
Justice denied: More money the best fix for court delays, say Crown lawyers

“The measure that [the government] is taking is not enough,” said CAQ  justice critic Simon Jolin-Barrette.

The third priority is a bill which recognizes foreign credentials. After the Quebec City mosque shooting, the Muslim community spoke out against discrimination in the workforce.

READ MORE:
Accused in Quebec City mosque shooting changes lawyer during brief appearance

At the time, the premier said it was more important to address racism in Quebec then pass its religious neutrality bill. Many thought Bill 62 was dead, but this summer the justice minister will call committee members back to the National Assembly to continue work on the religious neutrality bill.

Group takes legal action against Mont-Royal-Outremont riding merger

A group of citizens is taking the fight against the merger of the ridings of Mont-Royal and Outremont to the next level.

The group is now suing the Director General of the Quebec Elections Commission and the commission itself over the merger.

The group includes former Liberal MP Marlene Jennings, Côte-des-Neiges Notre-Dame-de-Grâce councillor Marvin Rotrand and The Suburban editor Beryl Wajsman.

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Related

  • Montrealers come out to oppose Mont-Royal-Outremont riding merger

    City hall passes resolution slamming merge between Mont-Royal and Outremont into one provincial riding

    READ MORE: Quebec minister says she doesn’t like new riding boundaries

    They have the support of mayors of the five cities affected: Town of Mount-Royal, Côte Saint-Luc, Côte-des-Neiges Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Outremont and Hampstead.

    They argue their residents’ votes will be diluted with the change.

    “This is a fundamental injustice and it really must be fought. It will have very significant implications for us in the future,” Hampstead mayor Bill Steinberg said.

    READ MORE: Electoral map reform worries Montreal borough and municipality mayors

    Prominent constitutional lawyer Julius Grey believes they have a case.

    Grey says the lawsuit is based on the issue of fair representation.

    “We think the result is unreasonable given the nature of Montreal’s population, the communities that are affected [by]  the political disenfranchisement that follows by this decision,” Grey said.

    The group has gathered about $26,000 to finance the legal fight.

    Contributions came from affected cities and their residents.

    READ MORE: Montrealers come out to oppose Mont-Royal-Outremont riding merger

    “Every day in the mail cheques are coming in, and we’re calling on the public to help us,” Rotrand said.

    Global News reached out to Quebec’s electoral commission, but officials declined an interview.

    Both parties will meet June 19 to fix a hearing date.

    The group hopes a ruling will come through before the next provincial election in fall 2018.

Danielle Smith: Conservative merger no guarantee of victory in Alberta

The first thing some will say about the announcement of an agreement in-principle to create the United Conservative Party is, “Boy conservatives do a crappy job of choosing acronyms.”

The UCP (You-See-Pee) party has already prompted columns, tweets and ridiculing memes: My favourite – “The Future is Yellow!” Why, oh why, does no one think of these things? It hearkens back to the days of  the Canadian Conservative Reform Alliance Party, or CCRAP, in what turned out to be the initial, and only partially successful, attempt to unite conservatives at the federal level. We can only hope the path forward for the new provincial party will be a smoother one. More on that in a minute.

Watch below: Jason Kenney and Brian Jean explain why they’re currently using the phrase United Conservative Party (UCP) amid mockery online.

The mechanics of bringing the parties together won’t be the stumbling block I had anticipated. It seems very straightforward and fast, which is a good thing. The members of both parties will have a chance to vote on the merger by July 22. If members agree, a new party will form and the legacy parties will wrap up. In keeping with the law that money cannot transfer to the new party, they will spend the money in their existing accounts and wrap up their respective liabilities.

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Related

  • Wildrose and PC MLAs speak to Albertans about progress on plan to unite the right

    Alberta Premier Rachel Notley reacts to potential PC/Wildrose merger

  • What an Alberta PC-Wildrose merger could mean for Rachel Notley’s NDP

    There will be an equal number of representatives from each party chosen for an interim board and the leadership election committee. An interim leader will be chosen who cannot run in the leadership race. The first leader will be chosen using the Wildrose rules of one-member-one-vote (though the voting structure might change in the future). That race will wrap up on October 28, 2017, which means the focus for the new leader can switch to election readiness fresh out of the gate in the new year.

    READ MORE:
    Alberta PCs, Wildrose unveil plans to merge, create United Conservative Party

    They have even, cleverly, worked out a backup plan if there is an early election (unlikely in this time frame) or members reject the proposal (more possible). It would involve working together to ensure the PC’s and Wildrose together get the majority of seats in the next legislature and then they’d continue their unity efforts post-election.

    After that it is clear sailing to a majority government right? Maybe not.

    It’s worth reviewing some of the federal history to understand what could go wrong.

    The federal party, CCRAP, became the Canadian Alliance and won only 66 seats and 25.5 per cent of the election of 2000. The Progressive Conservatives stayed separate until Stephen Harper and Peter MacKay brokered a deal to bring them together in 2003. Even after that, the progressive wing sat it out.

    In the subsequent election in 2004 the Conservatives won 99 seats and only 29.6 per cent of the vote. It took until 2011 to win a majority and support peaked out for the party at 39.6 per cent before being reduced to official opposition again in 2015.

    WATCH BELOW: Rachel Notley reacts to potential merger of Wildrose and PC parties

    So what’s the point? Two plus two doesn’t necessarily equal four in political calculations. The federal Conservative Party was never able to attract enough centrist voters to maintain a majority government for more than one election cycle. The UCP may face the same problem if no one other than Jason Kenney and Brian Jean enter the race.

    It’s fair to say that neither leader has been able to attract enough support on their own to secure a victory over Rachel Notley’s NDP. The New Democrats continue to dominate in Edmonton, Wildrose dominates rural Alberta and Calgary is almost evenly divided between all three parties.

    If Kenney was going to light the province on fire, he would have surged to the lead in public opinion polls during the PC leadership contest. He didn’t. If Jean was going to do the same, he wouldn’t be sitting at third place in support in Calgary.

    LISTEN: Rob Breakenridge interviews Jason Kenney on the proposed merger

    It’s clear that voters long for another choice. I keep getting asked if I think Rona Ambrose will enter into the contest. My answer: I wish. I suspect the vast majority of conservative minded voters do too.

    There is a wariness of both Kenney and Jean mostly because of their perceived stances on controversial social issues. If the new party becomes embroiled in controversies over abortion, LGBTQ rights, assisted dying, pot legalization and the like, it will do nothing to broaden its base.

    For UCP to be successful, it needs to offer an equally welcome home for those who have progressive views on these hot button issues. That’s going to require some fresh faces to enter the race.

    Any takers?

    Danielle Smith can be reached at [email protected]杭州桑拿.

Angela Kokott: One more blow against Alberta’s carbon levy

When will the Notley government admit the carbon levy is a big mistake? Right from the get go there has been one misstep after another.

There was criticism about an Ontario company being picked. Then, more criticism about having someone come into your home to screw in light bulbs and over the restrictions on what bulbs will be replaced. All of that criticism warranted.

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Related

  • Alberta making changes to carbon tax rebates

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    A closer look at where Alberta’s carbon tax revenues are going

     Roll out another program. Roll out more criticism.

    Then, on May 17, Finance Minister Joe Ceci issues a mea culpa. Thousands of families angry that they were forced to pay back the rebate given to loved ones who had passed away. Minister Ceci admitted “the program didn’t work as it should have”. 

    That’s an understatement.  

    Why was the rebate based on 2015 tax returns? Albertans weren’t paying the levy in 2015. Why weren’t the rebates based on 2017 tax returns  – the year we’re all paying the levy?

    READ MORE:
    Alberta making changes to carbon tax rebates

    I know.  I know.  The government wanted to start the rebate program even before the first dime was collected because it knew it had to get ahead of the criticism.

     Message to the government: it didn’t work.

     The carbon levy was sold to us as a policy needed to get pipelines to the east and west. With the B.C. election results up in the air and First Nations groups joining forces to oppose Keystone, the biggest criticism is yet to come. 

Sask. premier describes federal carbon tax plan as a ‘ransom note’

Federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna unveiled plans for a federally imposed carbon tax Thursday morning.

The price will be $10 per tonne of CO2 for any jurisdiction that has not developed their own carbon pricing strategy as early as next spring.

McKenna said every penny raised by the federal carbon price will be returned to the province it came from. The plan is to give it directly back to individuals and businesses through tax rebates.

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READ MORE: It’s not a carbon tax, it’s a ‘behaviour-changing measure’: government officials

Provinces that enact their own carbon pricing plan can choose how to spend the collected revenue.

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall remains staunchly opposed to the carbon tax, saying it would remove $1.3 billion from the provincial economy.

“This federal government white paper is more like a ransom note,” he said.

READ MORE: Environment Minister Scott Moe says Saskatchewan will never allow a carbon tax

Wall stood by previous arguments, that a price on carbon will disproportionately affect key Saskatchewan industries like mining and agriculture.

“Even if fuel tax is exempt [for agriculture] it will still impact fertilizer, inputs and transportation,” Wall said.

The premier did credit McKenna for acknowledging Saskatchewan based innovations including the Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) facility at Boundary Dam Three near Estevan, Sask., zero-till farming methods and ongoing research at the province’s universities.

However, Wall still believes investment in innovations like CCS should be seen as an alternative to a carbon tax.

Wall said the provincial government still plans to take legal action against the federal government.

READ MORE: Brad Wall criticizes attempt to link carbon tax with equalization payments

McKenna said Ottawa has the authority to impose a carbon tax on the province because protecting the environment is federal jurisdiction.

Officials from McKenna’s office added that this is not a tax in the traditional sense, because it is not intended to raise revenue for the federal government. Instead its goal is to change behavior when it comes to pollution.

READ MORE: Energy CEOs discuss Alberta’s carbon tax as Sask. continues to voice opposition

Saskatchewan has its own carbon tax framework that would target heavy emitters, and collected revenue would go toward an innovation fund. It was developed in 2009, but has not been implemented.

When asked by a reporter if Wall would sooner implement this plan or a forced federal carbon price, his response was simple.

“We’re going to win in court,” Wall said.

With files from the Canadian Press

More to come…

7-month-old baby who weighed 9 lbs died from gluten, lactose-free diet, court hears

A Belgian couple are on trial following the death of their seven-month-old son, who died of malnourishment after being fed an alternative diet.

Lucas, whose last name isn’t being revealed, died on June 6, 2014, weighing only nine pounds. According to local reports, he was suffering dehydration, and his stomach and intestines were found to be empty.

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Normal weight for male infants of that age ranges from 14.5 to 22 pounds, according to the World Health Organization.

Prosecutors say the boy’s death was a result of the parents feeding their son a restricted diet.

READ MORE: Spanish baby develops scurvy after parents feed him almond milk-only diet

The parents —; identified as Peter, 34, and Sandrina, 30 —; made the diagnosis that their son was gluten intolerant and had a lactose allergy. They began feeding him alternative products such as rice milk and quinoa milk.

Despite the parents’ concerns their child suffered from allergies, they did not seek professional advice. A search for medical documents for the child came up short.

“Not a single doctor had a dossier about Lucas and child protection services did not know about them,” prosecutors said.

In response, the baby’s father said: “We never went with Lucas to a doctor because we never noticed anything unusual.”

When it became apparent to the parents that their son was in need of urgent care, they sought help from a homeopathic doctor an hour’s drive from their home; the practitioner immediately sent them to the hospital, where their son was pronounced dead.

The parents, who own a natural health food store and have three other children, say their son was a happy child.

“We never wanted the death of our son,” his mother said.

New research released earlier this month warned people who don’t suffer from celiac disease to be wary of gluten-free diets, because these diets could put them at a higher risk of heart disease.

READ MORE:
Going gluten-free to ward off heart disease might have opposite effect: study

The case isn’t the first of its kind, with similar ones cropping up all over the world, prompting lawmakers to consider the effects of special diets on children.

In Italy, a bill introduced last summer could jail parents who imposed strict diets on their children. The law would see parents face a year in prison for raising kids on a vegan diet, and up to four years in prison if kids develop long-term health implications from their diet.

READ MORE:
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“I just find it absurd that some parents are allowed to impose their will on children in an almost fanatical, religious way, often without proper scientific knowledge or medical consultation… do-it-yourself on these matters terrorizes me,” Elvira Savino, the politician who proposed the bill, told Reuters at the time.

Closer to home, an Alberta couple was found guilty last year of failing to provide the necessities of life after their 18-month-old son died of bacterial meningitis. David and Collet Stephan had treated their son Ezekiel with home remedies that included garlic and horseradish.

READ MORE: Alberta meningitis death trial shines light on natural medicine

Critics say toddler’s meningitis death a wake-up call about natural medicine

02:42

Critics say toddler’s meningitis death a wake-up call about natural medicine

01:27

‘Very clear’ parents in Stephan meningitis trial did not meet necessities of care

01:43

Online post by father of Ezekiel Stephan criticizes prosecutor



*with files from Carmen Chai

Montreal’s Irish insist sacred burial ground shouldn’t be developed

Fergus Keyes walks through a parking lot near the Victoria Bridge, but unlike any other in the city, he considers this piece of land to be sacred ground.

Underneath the concrete lies the 150-year-old remains of thousands of Irish immigrants.

“Since 1907, Irish Montrealers have been asking for this space to be developed into a proper memorial space, but nothing has ever happened,” said Keyes, who is the director of the Montreal Irish Monument Park Foundation.

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He wants the land converted into a park and memorial.

In 1847, during the Irish Famine, 100,000 Irish immigrants came to Canada, but many contracted typhus and died.

“Six-thousand [people] were dying over a period of a couple of months,” Keyes said.

“In the end, they were being trenched, the bodies were being thrown in.”

Crown corporation Canada Lands Company (CLC) owns the land.

Keyes had asked the company to donate it to his group or the city, but told Global News he just found out the corporation sold the land to a developer.

“We have asked on numerous occasions, ‘what kind of development?’ but for some reason, they feel they don’t have to tell us who they sold the land to and what they plan to do with it,” Keyes said.

The CLC said in a statement the property is under contract for sale, but would provide few other details, despite Hydro-Quebec confirming to Global News that it bought the land.

The contract has an obligation to include a future Irish heritage commemoration, but did not say what that is.

“On a personal level, I would find it both disrespectful and insulting, not just to the Irish community, but to all of Montreal,” said Keyes.

There is an existing memorial across the street from the parking lot, known as the Black Rock, erected in 1859.

“We don’t believe it’s a proper memorial. It’s a small space, it sits in the middle of a bloody highway, it’s dangerous to get to,” he said.

Keyes hopes Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre will intervene.

“Clearly what happened in those days is important to commemorate, so we will take a look at it,” Coderre said.

The CLC confirmed its deal will close in July and there will be some sort of park on site, but Keyes argued he won’t be satisfied if any part of the land doesn’t respect what’s buried below.

It’s not a carbon tax, it’s a ‘behaviour-changing measure’: government officials

The Liberal government today released the carbon-pricing scheme it will impose on any province or territory that, by spring 2018, doesn’t have its own comparable scheme in place.

As of today, 97 per cent of Canadians live in provinces that either already have a price on carbon pollution, or are planning and working toward it, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Thursday.

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The three per cent of Canadians left out of that equation are in Saskatchewan – the one province that continues to hold out on signing on to the Trudeau government’s climate change plan.

READ MORE: Trump administration initiates NAFTA renegotiation process

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is so opposed to the idea, he has said he’ll fight Ottawa all the way to the Supreme Court.

But McKenna isn’t concerned. Rather she’s certain imposing a country-wide price on carbon pollution is Ottawa’s prerogative.

“We’ve been working hard to work with Saskatchewan,” she told reporters, noting she’s had more than a dozen meetings on this issue with the province’s environment minister.

“But let me be absolutely clear, that it is well within the federal government’s right to take action to protect the environment.”

READ MORE:
Sask. premier describes federal carbon tax plan as a ‘ransom note’

Environment Canada officials earlier in the day said a possible basis for legal action from Saskatchewan would be that the federal government cannot impose a tax on a province or territory. On that front, the feds are safe, the official said.

“This is not a revenue-raising tax,” he said. “This a behaviour-changing measure.”

Any revenue generated from whatever scheme a province develops will go right back to the province, though Ottawa is still determining exactly how that will happen; officials said they are so far looking at ways to return the funds to residents or businesses, which could help offset rising costs of energy.

Most Canadians live in jurisdictions where carbon pollution is already levied in some form.

B.C. and Alberta have carbon taxes, while Ontario and Quebec have cap-and-trade systems. Nova Scotia has said it intends to create a cap-and-trade system in 2018, and the other Atlantic provinces are gauging whether to join Nova Scotia’s plan or go it alone.

While the Liberal government is standing ready to impose the levy scheme it unveiled today, the scheme is also available to any province that doesn’t want to develop and implement its own.

Thursday’s “technical paper” on the federal carbon pricing plan details the levies on liquid, gas and solid fossil fuels Ottawa would impose in order to meet the targets Prime Minister Justin Trudeau laid out late last year.

READ MORE:
Brad Wall criticizes attempt to link carbon tax with equalization payments

Canada has agreed to cut its emissions to 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. That requires a reduction of almost 200 million tonnes of carbon-equivalent emissions in 13 years, or the equivalent of taking every car in Canada off the road, twice.

In October, Trudeau announced his government’s intention to introduce a minimum price – or “floor price” – for carbon pollution of $10 per tonne in 2018, increasing to $50 per tonne by 2022.

With files from

Forget casual sex – millennials want to date but don’t know how to have healthy relationships: report

Dating and hanging out with friends is top of mind for millennials, but difficult to do because they struggle with cultivating lasting and healthy romantic relationships, a new Harvard report says.

What they’re not up for, however, is casual sex.

According to researchers, teens and adults tend to “greatly overestimate” the hook-up culture of millennials, which fuels misconceptions that can be harmful to young people.

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READ MORE: Should people stay friends with their exes after a breakup?

“We hope that this report is a real wake-up call,” Dr. Richard Weissbourd, lead author of the study, said in a statement. “While adults, and parents in particular, wring their hands about the ‘hook-up culture,’ research indicated that far fewer young people are hooking up than is commonly believed.”

The study surveyed over 3,000 young adults between the ages of 18 and 25 in the U.S., as well as looked at several years of research by Weissbourd and his team. They also talked with adults who are key to the demographic, like parents, teachers, sport coaches and counsellors.

From their research, the team found that when people overestimate the hook-up culture of millennials, it can make them feel embarrassed or ashamed, and puts pressure on them to have sex when they’re not interested or ready.

As well, 70 per cent of respondents said they wished they had been given more information from their parents about the emotional aspects of romantic relationships.

“This focus on the hook-up culture also obscures two much bigger issues that our research suggests many young people are struggling with: forming and maintaining healthy and fulfilling romantic relationships and dealing with widespread misogyny and sexual harassment,” Weissbourd said. “Unfortunately, we also found that most adults appear to be doing very little to address these serious problems.”

In fact, 87 per cent of women who took part in the study said they’d experienced some form of sexual harassment during their lifetime, yet 76 per cent of said they’d never spoken to their parents about how to avoid sexually harassing others.

“[Adults] don’t say anything, even when sexual harassment is right in their midst,” Weissbourd told ABC News. “And many tell us… they don’t say anything because they don’t know what to say. And they fear that they won’t be effective, or they fear they will be written off.”

READ MORE: How to start dating again after ending a long-term relationship

This could be because many millennials don’t feel gender-based degradation is a problem in today’s society.

Digging deeper, researchers found that 48 per cent of young people believe that society has reached a point where double standards against women no longer exist.

Parents are also neglecting to discuss the issue of sexual assault.

Of the respondents, 61 per cent of say they’ve never talked about “being sure your partner wants to have sex and is comfortable doing so before having sex,” the report states. They’ve also never discussed assuring their own comfort before engaging in sex (49 per cent), the importance of not pressuring others into having sex (56 per cent), the importance not continuing that pressure to have sex despite the other person saying ‘no’ (62 per cent), or the importance of not having sex with someone who is too intoxicated or impaired to properly consent (57 per cent).

And those who did have those conversations with their parents say they were “at least somewhat influential.”

To address these issues, researchers offered up several tips for parents.

    Talk about love and help teens understand the differences between mature love and other form of attractionShow young people how to identify healthy and unhealthy relationshipsHelp young people identify misogyny and harassmentIf parents and educators see unhealthy relationship behaviours (like hearing degrading words, for example), they should interveneTalk about what it means to be ethical by helping them develop the skills to maintain healthy romantic relationships and treat those who are different from them with dignity and respect

For more tips, click here.

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