Halifax police issue over $1,500 in tickets after rescuing dogs from car, remind owners to keep pets safe

As Haligonians enjoy unusually warm weather Thursday, Halifax Regional Police (HRP) is reminding people the hot weather can mean added dangers for people’s furry friends — and to not leave them unattended in parked vehicles.

Police say that a car left unattended, even with the windows open, can quickly become like a furnace and can create possible “fatal consequences” for pets inside.

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Halifax police have already had to rescue two dogs from a vehicle during Thursday’s warm temperatures. According to Cindy Bayers, a police spokesperson, the driver of the vehicle was given three tickets; two $697.50 tickets for leaving animals in an unattended vehicle in conditions that could cause distress and one $250 ticket for owning an unlicensed dog.

Bayers says that if anyone sees a pet in immediate distress, they should call 911 immediately and take directions from the operator.

“We appreciate that people want to help but they’re opening themselves up to issues if they damage other peoples properties,” said Bayers.

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HRP have provided a list of alternatives should a person not be able to leave their pet at home:

If you’re visiting a restaurant, HRP suggests people use the drive-thru, allowing your pet to sit with you comfortably while you wait for your food. In addition, they remind people that many businesses have a drive-thru, not just fast-food establishments.Police say if you’re heading somewhere with your pet, bring a friend who can stay in the car and keep the pet company. The friend can also take the pet for a walk, stay in the shade or give the pet some water while they wait for you to return.More stores are allowing pets inside, police say. As a result, they suggest people shop “pet-friendly” by asking stores if they allow pets, and when you return, bring the pet indoors with you for a shopping excursion — though they remind people to make sure the pet is well-behaved before you bring them along.

Quebec pit bull ban and police uniform bills postponed

The provincial government will not pass two important bills which impact Montreal: the pit bull ban and the bill mandating proper uniforms for police officers will not come to a vote this June.

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Debate around other bills introduced by the justice minister was heated this week, but on Thursday, the government offered an olive branch to the opposition. It says it will make three of minister Stephanie Vallee’s bills its top priorities for the end of this session.

That means the pit bull law and the ban on colourful pants worn by police officers will not be passed before the National Assembly goes on summer break.

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“Certainly not,” government house leader Jean-Marc Fournier confirmed.

“This has been an almost do-nothing National Assembly led by the Liberals in the last year,” said Parti Quebecois leader Jean-François Lisée.

The government has its work cut out for it — and only a three-week deadline. The first priority is to make some adoption information, such as like family health history, available to adopted children. A version of this bill has been on the table for nine years.

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“It is a real priority… because it really concerns human lives,” said PQ justice critic Veronique Hivon.

The second priority is to fix delays in the justice system. Opposition parties are pressuring the government to use the notwithstanding clause to ignore the Supreme Court’s Jordan ruling.

People accused of murder and sexual assault have walked free because their cases have taken too long to go to trial.

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“The measure that [the government] is taking is not enough,” said CAQ  justice critic Simon Jolin-Barrette.

The third priority is a bill which recognizes foreign credentials. After the Quebec City mosque shooting, the Muslim community spoke out against discrimination in the workforce.

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At the time, the premier said it was more important to address racism in Quebec then pass its religious neutrality bill. Many thought Bill 62 was dead, but this summer the justice minister will call committee members back to the National Assembly to continue work on the religious neutrality bill.

Group takes legal action against Mont-Royal-Outremont riding merger

A group of citizens is taking the fight against the merger of the ridings of Mont-Royal and Outremont to the next level.

The group is now suing the Director General of the Quebec Elections Commission and the commission itself over the merger.

The group includes former Liberal MP Marlene Jennings, Côte-des-Neiges Notre-Dame-de-Grâce councillor Marvin Rotrand and The Suburban editor Beryl Wajsman.

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  • Montrealers come out to oppose Mont-Royal-Outremont riding merger

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    READ MORE: Quebec minister says she doesn’t like new riding boundaries

    They have the support of mayors of the five cities affected: Town of Mount-Royal, Côte Saint-Luc, Côte-des-Neiges Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Outremont and Hampstead.

    They argue their residents’ votes will be diluted with the change.

    “This is a fundamental injustice and it really must be fought. It will have very significant implications for us in the future,” Hampstead mayor Bill Steinberg said.

    READ MORE: Electoral map reform worries Montreal borough and municipality mayors

    Prominent constitutional lawyer Julius Grey believes they have a case.

    Grey says the lawsuit is based on the issue of fair representation.

    “We think the result is unreasonable given the nature of Montreal’s population, the communities that are affected [by]  the political disenfranchisement that follows by this decision,” Grey said.

    The group has gathered about $26,000 to finance the legal fight.

    Contributions came from affected cities and their residents.

    READ MORE: Montrealers come out to oppose Mont-Royal-Outremont riding merger

    “Every day in the mail cheques are coming in, and we’re calling on the public to help us,” Rotrand said.

    Global News reached out to Quebec’s electoral commission, but officials declined an interview.

    Both parties will meet June 19 to fix a hearing date.

    The group hopes a ruling will come through before the next provincial election in fall 2018.

Danielle Smith: Conservative merger no guarantee of victory in Alberta

The first thing some will say about the announcement of an agreement in-principle to create the United Conservative Party is, “Boy conservatives do a crappy job of choosing acronyms.”

The UCP (You-See-Pee) party has already prompted columns, tweets and ridiculing memes: My favourite – “The Future is Yellow!” Why, oh why, does no one think of these things? It hearkens back to the days of  the Canadian Conservative Reform Alliance Party, or CCRAP, in what turned out to be the initial, and only partially successful, attempt to unite conservatives at the federal level. We can only hope the path forward for the new provincial party will be a smoother one. More on that in a minute.

Watch below: Jason Kenney and Brian Jean explain why they’re currently using the phrase United Conservative Party (UCP) amid mockery online.

The mechanics of bringing the parties together won’t be the stumbling block I had anticipated. It seems very straightforward and fast, which is a good thing. The members of both parties will have a chance to vote on the merger by July 22. If members agree, a new party will form and the legacy parties will wrap up. In keeping with the law that money cannot transfer to the new party, they will spend the money in their existing accounts and wrap up their respective liabilities.

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    There will be an equal number of representatives from each party chosen for an interim board and the leadership election committee. An interim leader will be chosen who cannot run in the leadership race. The first leader will be chosen using the Wildrose rules of one-member-one-vote (though the voting structure might change in the future). That race will wrap up on October 28, 2017, which means the focus for the new leader can switch to election readiness fresh out of the gate in the new year.

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    They have even, cleverly, worked out a backup plan if there is an early election (unlikely in this time frame) or members reject the proposal (more possible). It would involve working together to ensure the PC’s and Wildrose together get the majority of seats in the next legislature and then they’d continue their unity efforts post-election.

    After that it is clear sailing to a majority government right? Maybe not.

    It’s worth reviewing some of the federal history to understand what could go wrong.

    The federal party, CCRAP, became the Canadian Alliance and won only 66 seats and 25.5 per cent of the election of 2000. The Progressive Conservatives stayed separate until Stephen Harper and Peter MacKay brokered a deal to bring them together in 2003. Even after that, the progressive wing sat it out.

    In the subsequent election in 2004 the Conservatives won 99 seats and only 29.6 per cent of the vote. It took until 2011 to win a majority and support peaked out for the party at 39.6 per cent before being reduced to official opposition again in 2015.

    WATCH BELOW: Rachel Notley reacts to potential merger of Wildrose and PC parties

    So what’s the point? Two plus two doesn’t necessarily equal four in political calculations. The federal Conservative Party was never able to attract enough centrist voters to maintain a majority government for more than one election cycle. The UCP may face the same problem if no one other than Jason Kenney and Brian Jean enter the race.

    It’s fair to say that neither leader has been able to attract enough support on their own to secure a victory over Rachel Notley’s NDP. The New Democrats continue to dominate in Edmonton, Wildrose dominates rural Alberta and Calgary is almost evenly divided between all three parties.

    If Kenney was going to light the province on fire, he would have surged to the lead in public opinion polls during the PC leadership contest. He didn’t. If Jean was going to do the same, he wouldn’t be sitting at third place in support in Calgary.

    LISTEN: Rob Breakenridge interviews Jason Kenney on the proposed merger

    It’s clear that voters long for another choice. I keep getting asked if I think Rona Ambrose will enter into the contest. My answer: I wish. I suspect the vast majority of conservative minded voters do too.

    There is a wariness of both Kenney and Jean mostly because of their perceived stances on controversial social issues. If the new party becomes embroiled in controversies over abortion, LGBTQ rights, assisted dying, pot legalization and the like, it will do nothing to broaden its base.

    For UCP to be successful, it needs to offer an equally welcome home for those who have progressive views on these hot button issues. That’s going to require some fresh faces to enter the race.

    Any takers?

    Danielle Smith can be reached at [email protected]杭州桑拿.