Crime Stoppers: Appeal for information about missing Abbotsford couple

In a mysterious disappearance, an Abbotsford couple vanishes without a trace.

Rosalie Jean Allan known as Rose was reported missing by a friend in December of 2013. Investigators soon realized that Rose’s  boyfriend Jonathan Wood was also missing.

It’s been a particularly difficult case for investigators in Abbotsford who say they’ve had very little information and few leads.

Police and Crime Stoppers need your help. Do you have any information that could help crack the case?

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The couple, described as being in an “on again, off again relationship” had been living together on Glenmore Rd in North Abbotsford in late October 2013.

Previously the couple were known to frequent an area of downtown Abbotsford known as Five Corners as well as the Salvation Army on Gladys Ave.

Rose, known by many as a vibrant person,  loved animals and made friends easily. Her family says they love and miss her. Despite her transient lifestyle she managed to keep in touch with her parents.  Her father says his daughter was in good spirits when she went missing. Her parents and Jonathan’s parents are pleading for anyone with information to come forward.

At the time of her disappearance Rose was 46 years old. She is 5′ 4″ and weighs 130 pounds. She has brown hair and blue eyes.

Jonathan’s 6’2”, 180 pounds, with brown hair and blue eyes.  He has an outstanding theft warrant but police say it’s not a serious matter.

Police say it’s highly unlikely for them to simply disappear. Can you help solve this mystery?

If you know anything call police…or if you’d like to remain anonymous visit bccrimestoppers杭州桑拿 or call 1 888 222- 8477.

Japanese princess giving up royal status in order to marry commoner

Princess Mako, the granddaughter of Japan’s emperor, will marry an ocean-loving legal assistant who can ski, play the violin and cook.

Japanese nuptials tend to be highly ritualized, especially for a royal family member, and the buildup to the wedding is likely to take time. A public announcement would come first, then a wedding date would be set and then the couple will make a formal report to the emperor and empress.

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Quasi-public NHK TV reported the news late Tuesday and the Imperial Household Agency confirmed the report to Japanese media who belong to an exclusive “press club” system. But the agency declined comment to The Associated Press.

The man who won the princess’ heart spoke to reporters Wednesday, and his comments dominated national TV coverage though he gave few details.

READ MORE: Princess Charlotte’s brand is worth $3.8 billion and she’s only 2 years old

Kei Komuro said he works as a legal assistant and had just spoken over the phone with Mako, who had been a fellow student at International Christian University in Tokyo.

“When the right time comes, I’d like to talk about it,” he told reporters, bowing repeatedly, wearing a suit and tie.

The couple, who are both 25, met at a restaurant in Tokyo’s Shibuya about five years ago at a party to talk about studying abroad, and they have been dating several times a month recently, NHK said.

Komuro was once tapped as “Prince of the Sea” to promote tourism to the beaches of Shonan in Kanagawa prefecture, a facet of his profile highlighted by local media.

Women can’t succeed to the Chrysanthemum Throne. Mako’s father and her younger brother are in line to succeed Emperor Akihito, but after her uncle Crown Prince Naruhito, who is first in line.

Once she marries, Mako will no longer be a princess and will become a commoner.

NHK said Mako has already introduced Komuro to her parents, and they approve. A formal announcement could come as soon as next month, Japanese media said.

READ MORE: Facebook could face legal action if it doesn’t remove posts about Thai King

Unlike royalty in Great Britain and other European countries, the emperor and his family tend to be cloistered, although they travel abroad and appear at cultural events.

Akihito, 83, is the son of Hirohito, Japan’s emperor during World War II.

Akihito expressed his desire to abdicate last year, and Japan has been preparing legislation especially for him so he can.

Until Japan’s defeat at the end of World War II, Hirohito was viewed as divine, and no one had even heard his voice. But the times are changing, and the Japanese public harbours a feeling of openness and familiarity toward the emperor and his family. People are likely to see Mako’s marriage as a celebration, although the rituals will continue to be tightly orchestrated.

WATCH: Highlights from Prince George and Princess Charlotte’s Canadian visit

Princess Charlotte and Prince George have some fun with balloons and animals

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Princess Charlotte and Prince George have some fun with balloons and animals

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Princess Charlotte and Prince George watch balloon maker at children’s party

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Princess Charlotte dances with her mom, Kate, at children’s party in Victoria

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Boy gives flowers to Princess Charlotte, but gets denied on high five from Prince George

00:53

Governor General says goodbye to Prince George and Princess Charlotte



COMMENTARY: Is cultural appropriation an act of theft or artistic literary exploration?

Two Canadian magazine editors have resigned and a television producer has been reassigned after defending the right of authors and other artists to take inspiration from cultures different than their own.

The phenomenon in question is called cultural appropriation: Inherent in the name is the implication that the act is theft, rather than a literary exploration of a world beyond the writer’s own.

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Toronto painter Amanda PL was quite open about her work taking inspiration in both style and subject matter from an Anishnaabe artist. She was honouring that artist, not plagiarizing. But that didn’t stop the Visions Gallery from cancelling the event, capitulating to the mob of people accusing the artist of racism and colonialism.

READ MORE: Let’s start with what cultural appropriation is not

And then came Hal Niedzviecki, the editor of Write — the magazine of the Writers’ Union of Canada (TWUC) — who contended that authors should be not only be allowed, but encouraged, to craft characters across the spectrum of cultures.

“In my opinion, anyone, anywhere, should be encouraged to imagine other peoples, other cultures, other identities,” he said in the editor’s note, for which TWUC has since apologized.

The union apologized for the hurt caused by the piece, and rather ironically said the magazine aims to be “sincerely encouraging to all voices.” Except in apologizing for Niedzviecki’s piece, the union is in effect saying not all voices are welcome.

READ MORE: Walrus editor Jonathan Kay resigns amid cultural appropriation controversy

The union’s “equity task force” (the in-house legislator for the aggrieved) called for sensitivity training, “affirmative action hiring” practices, turning over the magazine to editors from indigenous communities for the next three issues, and a paid equity officer who must be “active and respected in anti-oppression cultural movements for at least three years.” Of course, this role has priority for “indigenous writers, racialized writers, writers with disabilities and trans writers.”

Any sensible person would see this response — and the myriad accusations of racism directed towards Niedzviecki — as excessive. Especially since Niedzviecki himself wrote his now-maligned column in the spirit of bridging understanding across cultures.

And then came former Walrus editor-in-chief Jonathan Kay, who critiqued the “mobbing” of Niedzviecki in a tweet, on a CBC panel discussion, and again in a National Post column — the latter of which culminated in his abrupt resignation from the magazine, citing a trend of “self-censorship” that put his Walrus role at odds with his scrappy columnist instincts.

Managing editor Steve Ladurantaye of CBC’s The National was part of a 杭州桑拿会所 exchange suggesting an “appropriation prize” — even offering to chip in some money for it — for the best example of appropriation each year. Despite posting a heartfelt series of apology tweets vowing to do better in the future, he was reassigned to another role at CBC.

Days after his resignation, Niedzviecki went on a pandering apology tour, saying the situation “breaks my heart.”

He said on CBC’s The Current that his goal was to “push some buttons within the writing community and make sure we didn’t err so much on the side of caution that we’re no longer able to, say, put a person of colour in a piece of writing.”

If that truly was the intention, he should be declaring victory rather than apologizing. He certainly pushed buttons, and proved that the writers’ community is willing to stomp on the value of literary freedom.

Whether a white author should craft a black or aboriginal character is secondary to the far more important point, which is that a writer can create whatever work he or she wants to, for whatever reason. That’s what art is. That’s what freedom of speech is.

There is a fundamental difference, I admit, between censorship imposed by the state — the most egregious kind — and censorship that is self-imposed because of a political or ideological climate, but the result is the same. In both cases, ideas and speech are stifled, meaning thought itself is subverted.

Speaking at an academic freedom conference at Western University in London, Ont. last weekend, academic firebrand Jordan Peterson labelled free speech “the process through which ideas are generated.”

We often view speech as the way ideas are shared, but that process — the dialogue of exchanging ideas — is how new ideas, and by extension new truths, emerge. In the fiction world, it’s how new perspectives and stories emerge.

When bestselling author Lionel Shriver took aim at cultural appropriation during a literary conference last September, she faced many of the same accusations of racism and privilege directed towards the players in the TWUC kerfuffle.

One of the most important points she raised was how much great work simply wouldn’t exist if not for the creators taking influence from people unlike them.

She cited Graham Greene, Malcolm Lowry, Matthew Kneale, and Maria McCann — all writers whose work involved using voices of people of different races, background, and sexual orientations.

To dogmatically impose the cliche “write what you know” on writers would make literature very boring. Whether you’re reading a book about wizardry, spies or bank robbers, there’s a high likelihood that the author wrote it from a place outside of their own identity.

We need to restart viewing that as art, not theft.

Andrew Lawton is host of The Andrew Lawton Show on AM980 London and a commentator for Global News.

Jail time handed down to 3 men caught abusing dairy cows on Chilliwack farm

Jail time has been handed down to three men today who were caught on video abusing dairy cows at a Chilliwack farm in 2014.

They were seen in an undercover video that showed cows being beaten at Chilliwack Cattle Sales Ltd.

The footage was collected using secret cameras as part of an undercover operation conducted by the animal-rights activist group Mercy For Animals.

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Former employee Travis Keefer was given seven days in jail and cannot be in care or control of any animals for one year. The two other defendants, Chris Vandyke and Jamie Visser, both received 60 days in jail and cannot be in care or control of any animals for three years.

The judge said the sentences will be served on weekends so they will still be able to maintain their jobs.

Twenty counts of animal cruelty were laid against Chilliwack Cattle Sales Ltd., with 16 falling under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act.

The BC SPCA said it received the undercover video in June 2014 showing dairy cows being beaten with chains, canes and rakes. The footage also showed cows being kicked and punched after they were trapped and could not escape the abuse.

The B.C. SPCA said the case marks the first time a B.C. company has been held accountable for acts of animal cruelty on a farm.

“The judge didn’t have any prior cases to give him a lot of guidance for something like this,” said criminal defence lawyer Craig Sicotte. “So he put a lot of thought into it and gave a sentence that obviously my three clients aren’t thrilled with, they have to go to jail, but I think, at the end of the day, this will set the tone for a lot of sentences like this.”

When the sentences were handed out there was a lot of emotion from the suspects’ family members.

“I don’t think any of the family members are thrilled to see these three young men go off to custody,” said Sicotte. “These are young men from good families, they have jobs, they have a lot of support.”

The judge did agree the three men were not properly trained or supervised.

Last December, president of Chilliwack Cattle Sales, Kenneth Kooyman, pleaded guilty to three charges of animal cruelty. His brother, who is a director at the facility, pleaded guilty to one charge. They were fined $300,000 total along with another $45,000 to help fund victim services.